@ Your Library 4.24.18

Earth Day

@ Your Library

By Beverly Ewart

4.24.18

It’s challenging to imagine climate change when the climate doesn’t seem to change fast enough here in the North Country.  We are a few weeks into spring already, and have nothing to show for it! (Well, okay, the turkey vultures are back.) Wrapped in scarves and parkas, just trying to survive, we aren’t likely to be thinking about the effects of warmer than average sea temperatures on fragile coral reef ecosystems.  But last Sunday was Earth Day, and, though I am still sort of hibernating, I thought this would be a good time to highlight some of our resources about the planet, conservation, and activism on behalf of the Earth.  Even in parkas, there’s much we can do. We can at least pick up after ourselves - trash is so easy to see this time of year!

  • The End of Nature by Bill McKibben.  An essay about the consequences of climate change caused by environmental abuse. Don’t read it if you are already having trouble sleeping at night.
  • Silent Spring by Rachel Carson. First published by Houghton Mifflin in 1962, Silent Spring alerted a large audience to the environmental and human dangers of indiscriminate use of pesticides, spurring revolutionary changes in the laws affecting our air, land, and water. "Silent Spring became a runaway bestseller, with international reverberations . . . [It is] well crafted, fearless and succinct . . . Even if she had not inspired a generation of activists, Carson would prevail as one of the greatest nature writers in American letters" (Peter Matthiessen, for Time’s 100 Most Influential People of the Century).This fortieth anniversary edition celebrates Rachel Carson’s watershed book with a new introduction by the author and activist Terry Tempest Williams and a new afterword by the acclaimed Rachel Carson biographer Linda Lear, who tells the story of Carson’s courageous defense of her truths in the face of ruthless assault from the chemical industry in the year following the publication of Silent Spring and before her untimely death in 1964.
  • Hot, Flat, and Crowded by Thomas L. Friedman.  In this brilliant, essential book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Thomas L. Friedman speaks to America's urgent need for national renewal and explains how a green revolution can bring about both a sustainable environment and a sustainable America. Friedman explains how global warming, rapidly growing populations, and the expansion of the world's middle class through globalization have produced a dangerously unstable planet--one that is "hot, flat, and crowded." In this "Release 2.0 "edition, he also shows how the very habits that led us to ravage the natural world led to the meltdown of the financial markets and the Great Recession. The challenge of a sustainable way of life presents the United States with an opportunity not only to rebuild its economy, but to lead the world in radically innovating toward cleaner energy. And it could inspire Americans to something we haven't seen in a long time--nation-building in America--by summoning the intelligence, creativity, and concern for the common good that are our greatest national resources. "Hot, Flat, and Crowded" is classic Thomas L. Friedman: fearless, incisive, forward-looking, and rich in surprising common sense about the challenge--and the promise--of the future.
  • The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind by William Kamkwamba. This immensely engaging tale relates how an enterprising teenager in Malawi builds a windmill from scraps he finds around his village and brings electricity, and a future, to his family.  
  • The Story of Stuff: How Our Obsession With Stuff is Trashing the Planet, our Communities, and Our Health--and a Vision for Change by Annie Leonard.  

Library Programs:

Baby Storytime happens on Tuesdays from 10-10:45am. Children ages 0-18 months and their caregivers are invited to experience books and participate in bounce rhymes, songs, finger plays, and social/play time. There is no registration necessary for this program.

Toddler Story Time (18-35 months) meets Monday mornings 10:30am-11am and runs in 4-week sessions. Registration is required, so please be sure to contact Valerie White at 315 386-3712 ext. 4.  There are still openings in the Toddler Story Time session beginning April 30th and continuing three Mondays in May, for which children ages 18-35 months may be registered.

Preschool Storytime meets Wednesday mornings from 10:30-11:15 am. This popular program features books, flannel board stories, songs, finger plays, movement, and crafts. Preschool Storytime is designed for 3-5 year olds and their caregivers. No registration is needed.

The Junior Writers’ Group at the Canton Free Library meets from 3:30-4:50 pm the second and last Thursday of every month. This creative and lively group is for children ages 8-12 who like to have fun with words. Children should bring paper and a writing instrument. Questions? Contact Linda Batt 344-6592 or linda.batt06@gmail.com

Teen Programs:

Anime Club is on hold during our job search for a new Young Adult Services Specialist.

Casuals Wielding Dice will continue to meet every Monday and Wednesday from 3pm-5pm at Canton Free Library. Join Game Master David Crowell for imaginative adventures involving critical thinking, problem solving, teamwork, and creativity!  

Hours: Canton Free Library is open Monday 9:30am - 8pm, Tuesday 9:30am - 5pm, Wednesday 9:30am - 8pm, Thursday 9:30am -5pm, Friday 9:30am -5pm, and Saturdays from 10am -3pm. Please note that the book drop remains open 24/7 for returns. Rensselaer Falls Branch Library is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 3pm -6pm. Morley Branch Library is open Tuesday and Thursday 1pm -6pm.

For more CFL news,“like” the library page on Facebook.  Find new additions to our collection on our website: cantonfreelibrary.org. To renew your current checkouts, login to ncls.org; you may also renew via email at canlib@ncls.org, or by calling (315) 386-3712.

Transform the planet @ your library.