@ Your Library 4.3.18

Poetry Month

 

@ Your Library

By Beverly Ewart

4.3.18


April is National Poetry Month!

Do you do Haiku?

Is a Sonnet more your style?

Does Shakespeare move you;

e.e. cummings

make

you

smile?

 

Do you know Rondeau?

Have you written Villanelles?

What about an Ode

To the She who sells sea shells?

 

Can you write Blank Verse?

Have you tried an Epigram?

Is your Burlesque terse?

Pick the mic up at a Slam!

 

Visit the library, check out some rhymes;

You can peruse a Couplet at a time!  

- Beverly

  • Poemcrazy: Freeing Your Life With Words by Susan Wooldridge - This little book is a delight to read; full of writing prompts and inspirational stories from the author’s interactions with budding poets of all ages as she travels around the country teaching writing workshops. One of my all-time favorites!

  • Her. by Alex Jeanty Pierre .  "A collection of poetry and prose about women, their strengths and beauty. This is a beautiful expression of heartfelt emotion using short, gratifying sentiments. "--cAmazon.

  • Where the sidewalk ends : The poems & drawings of Shel Silverstein.

  • To this day : for the bullied and beautiful by Shane Koyczan. In February 2013, Shane Koyczan's passionate anti-bullying poem "To This Day" electrified the world. An animated video of the lyric narrative went viral, racking up over 12 million hits to date and inspiring an international movement against bullying in schools. Shane later performed the piece to sustained applause on the stage of the 2013 annual TED Conference. Now this extraordinary work has been adapted into an equally moving and visually arresting book. Thirty international artists, as diverse as they are talented, have been inspired to create exceptional art to accompany "To This Day." Each page is a vibrant collage of images, colors and words that will resonate powerfully with anyone who has experienced bullying themselves, whether as a victim, observer, or participant. Born of Shane's own experiences of being bullied as a child, To This Day expresses the profound and lasting effect of bullying on an individual, while affirming the strength and inner resources that allow people to move beyond the experience. A heartfelt preface and afterword, along with resources for kids affected by bullying, make this book an invaluable centerpiece of the anti-bullying movement.

  • Before There is Nowhere to Stand : Palestine/Israel : Poets Respond to the Struggle edited by Joan Dobbie & Grace Beeler with Edward Morin.  Appalled by the violence of Israel's Operation Cast Lead against Gaza in 2008/2009, Joan Dobbie and her niece Grace Beeler, descendants of Holocaust survivors, issued a call for poems by writers of "Palestinian or Jewish heritage. . . for an anthology that strives for understanding . . . in the belief that poetry can create understanding and understanding can dull hatred." The poems are arranged in seven sections, each dealing with an attribute or phase of the Palestine-Israel struggle. When possible, selections alternate between Jewish and Arab authors, effecting dissonance in subject, emphasis, and attitude--an uneasy multiculturalism.

  • Thirst by Mary Oliver. In this collection of 43 poems the author grapples with grief at the death of her beloved partner of over forty years. She strives to experience sorrow as a path to spiritual progress, grief as part of loving and not its end. She also chronicles for the first time her discovery of faith, without abandoning the love of the physical world that has been a hallmark of her work for four decades.

  • Good Poems selected and introduced by Garrison Keillor. Every day people tune in to The Writer's Almanac on public radio and hear Garrison Keillor read them a poem. This is an anthology of poems from the show, chosen by the narrator for their wit, their frankness, their passion, their "utter clarity in the face of everything else a person has to deal with at 7 a.m." The title Good Poems comes from common literary parlance. For writers, it's enough to refer to somebody having written a good poem. Somebody else can worry about greatness. Mary Oliver's "Wild Geese" is a good poem, and so is James Wright's "A Blessing." Regular people love those poems. People read them aloud at weddings, people send them by e-mail. Good Poems includes poems about lovers, children, failure, everyday life, death, and transcendence. It features the work of classic poets, such as Emily Dickinson, Walt Whitman, and Robert Frost, as well as the work of contemporary greats such as Howard Nemerov, Charles Bukowski, Donald Hall, Billy Collins, Robert Bly, and Sharon Olds. It's a book of poems for anybody who loves poetry whether they know it or not.


Library Programs:

Baby Storytime happens on Tuesdays from 10-10:45am. Children ages 0-18 months and their caregivers are invited to experience books and participate in bounce rhymes, songs, finger plays, and social/play time. There is no registration necessary for this program.

Toddler Story Time (18-35 months) meets Monday mornings 10:30am-11am and runs in 4-week sessions. Registration is required, so please be sure to contact Valerie White at 315 386-3712 ext. 4.  There are still openings in the Toddler Story Time sessions in April and May, for which children ages 18-35 months may be registered.

Preschool Storytime meets Wednesday mornings from 10:30-11:15 am. This popular program features books, flannel board stories, songs, finger plays, movement, and crafts. Preschool Storytime is designed for 3-5 year olds and their caregivers. No registration is needed.

The Junior Writers’ Group at the Canton Free Library meets from 3:30-4:50 pm the second and last Thursday of every month. This creative and lively group is for children ages 8-12 who like to have fun with words. Children should bring paper and a writing instrument. Questions? Contact Linda Batt 344-6592 or linda.batt06@gmail.com

Teen Programs:

Anime Club is on hold during our job search for a new Young Adult Services Specialist! Interested in applying? Check out the details on our website at www.cantonfreelibrary.org/job .

Casuals Wielding Dice will continue to meet each Wednesday from 3pm-5pm at Canton Free Library. Join Game Master David Crowell for imaginative adventures involving critical thinking, problem solving, teamwork, and creativity!  

Hours: Canton Free Library is open Monday 9:30am - 8pm, Tuesday 9:30am - 5pm, Wednesday 9:30am - 8pm, Thursday 9:30am -5pm, Friday 9:30am -5pm, and Saturdays from 10am -3pm. Please note that the book drop remains open 24/7 for returns. Rensselaer Falls Branch Library is open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday from 3pm -6pm. Morley Branch Library is open Tuesday and Thursday 1pm -6pm.

For more CFL news, “like” the library page on Facebook.  Find new additions to our collection on our website: cantonfreelibrary.org. To renew your current checkouts, login to  ncls.org; you may also renew via email at canlib@ncls.org, or by calling (315) 386-3712.

Wax poetic @ your library!